Giacomo Comiati

First name: 
Giacomo
Last name: 
Comiati
Title: 
MA, PhD
Position: 
Research fellow

Giacomo is a research fellow at the University of Padua, working on the project “The Sick Body Politic of the Republic. Lyric poetry and theatre (late 16th–early 18th century)”. He previously worked as a research postdoctoral fellow at the University of Oxford on the project "Petrarch Commentary and Exegesis in Renaissance Italy, c.1350–c.1650”. He was a research associate to Corpus Christi College, Oxford.

Giacomo read Italian and Latin at the University of Padua while attending the Scuola Galileiana di Studi Superiori (the School of Excellence of Padua University). He graduated in Italian Philology and then took his PhD in Italian Studies at the University of Warwick. His PhD project dealt with the reception of the Latin poet Horace in the Italian Renaissance (1498–1600). He was fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS) at Warwick and then junior research fellow at the Dahlem Humanities Center of the Freie Universität in Berlin. He was visiting fellow at the Newberry Library in Chicago (2013), Fondation Hardt in Geneva (2014), and Columbia University and Houghton Library of Harvard University (2014).

His research interests include the Renaissance reception of Latin antiquity, Renaissance Latin poetry, Petrarch’s works, Early Modern history of manuscript and print, Italian Petrarchism, sixteenth-century Venetian poetry, and Italian Courtly literature. He edited a volume on Aldus Manutius (Aldo Manuzio editore, umanista e filologo, Milan: Ledizioni, 2019) and wrote articles on the Horatian reception in the Renaissance, the book of rhymes by Celio Magno, Cristoforo Landino’s Latin poems, Bernardo Tasso’s Italian odes, Baldassarre Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier, Giovanni Della Casa’s Carmina, and Marcantonio Flaminio’s Latin production. 

At the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute, where he is currently a research fellow, he will be working on a corpus of sixteenth-century Latin translations of some sonnets by Petrarch.